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Are California workers required to give notice when quitting?

On Behalf of | Dec 7, 2022 | Wrongful Termination

For whatever reason, you want to quit your current role and move on with your life. Your employer, however, believes you cannot leave just yet. They claim you are one of their most dedicated employees.

If you find yourself in a situation where your employer is adamant about letting you go, you might wonder whether you have to notify your employer or simply go MIA.

California is an at-will employment state

California, like most states, applies at-will employment laws. This means that either party can terminate the employment contract at any time and/or for whatever reasons, provided those reasons do not violate either party’s rights, of course. For instance, the employer cannot dismiss you based on your protected characteristics.

There are exceptions to this statute, though

If you signed an employment contract, then you need to find out what your contract says about quitting. Your employer’s handbook will also provide more insights into the process of resigning from your role. Most often, your contract will indicate the timeframe within which you must give notice to your employer before leaving.

Even if you don’t have to, giving notice is usually prudent

While the law does not require you to give your California employer notice before leaving, doing so is a good practice. Giving a resignation notice allows your employer to plan for your replacement, thus, ensuring work continuity.

Giving notice also ensures that you and your employer part ways on good terms. And this is helpful in a couple of ways. For instance, this can make you eligible for rehire in the future. It also sets the stage for a positive reference from your employer.

Employment disputes arise when they are least expected, like when terminating employment engagement. Find out how you can safeguard your rights and interests when ending your at-will employment in California.

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